The Best Lighthouses To Visit

There is something endearing about lighthouses. They are symbols of safety, of guidance, and even of hope, and yet they also can be icons of solitude or loneliness, which is often highlighted by the dramatic

There is something endearing about lighthouses. They are symbols of safety, of guidance, and even of hope, and yet they also can be icons of solitude or loneliness, which is often highlighted by the dramatic settings in which they are built.

Some lighthouses, especially those built in days long past, need to be seen to be believed. It is not always possible to climb the towers, but even standing at their base is sure to take your breath away. These are the 4 that you should add to your bucket list.

  1. Tourlitis Lighthouse, Greece

At your first sighting of Greece’s Tourlitis Lighthouse, you could be forgiven for thinking that it is the remnant of a fairy castle. First built on a naturally formed column of rock near the Andros Island in the Aegean Sea in 1897, the building was destroyed during the Second World War.

The current structure was built during the 1990s by a wealthy businessman. The fantasy element of the structure is enhanced by a staircase that partially winds around the rock pillar on which the tower stands.

  1. Tower Of Hercules Lighthouse, Spain

The world’s oldest lighthouse, the Tower of Hercules was originally built by the Romans near the Spanish city of Corunna in AD 200. What makes the structure even more interesting is that it was based on the Lighthouse of Alexandria, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. If visiting an ancient lighthouse doesn’t tickle your fancy, you may prefer to play bingo New Zealand games online.

The structure was left largely unaltered for 1700 years, until in 1791, another level was added to the tower. The building was declared a national monument as well as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2009.

  1. Thomas Point Shoal Light, Maryland USA

Located in the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland USA, the Thomas Point Shoal Light is a screw-pile, cottage-type lighthouse that was built in 1873. The structure replaced several stone lighthouses that had been destroyed by erosion.

The wooden cottage and tower stand atop cast-iron pilings and a steel substructure. The lighthouse is automated, and you can visit the former keeper’s quarters during the summer months. To reach the site, you will need to take a boat tour from Annapolis.

  1. Cape Point Lighthouses, South Africa

If you want to visit lighthouses in a truly dramatic setting, head to the Cape Point Nature Reserve near Cape Town, South Africa. The Old Lighthouse was built in 1859, and it sits at 238m above sea level. However, the elevation meant that its beams were obscured by fog, making them invisible to passing ships.

The new lighthouse was built in 1919 at an elevation of 87m above sea level, and after its electrification in 1936, it became the most powerful lighthouse in Africa. You can visit both lighthouses by following the Lighthouse Keepers Trail. Getting to the older structure is particularly exciting, because you can take the Flying Dutchman funicular from the lower station to the upper station.